clinical intelligence for supply chain leadership

Medical supply economics in 2018 and beyond

In a time when quality of care impacts reimbursement and reimbursement affects quality care, all parties in the healthcare system feel the impact and...

10 unexpected realities nurses face

When I decided to become a nurse, I didn’t have a clue. I wasn’t aware of the educational options available to me, what nursing...

Harmonic inversion

Amazon executives spent the better part of the last few years researching and studying the healthcare industry – covertly and overtly – in an effort to learn how the company might venture to “do it better.” Let them.

Getting serious about infection prevention:Tips for evaluating your infection prevention screening needs Part Two

In last week’s post we examined the human and financial toll of hospital acquired infections (HAIs). Now let’s discuss what you can do to...

Getting serious about infection prevention: Tips for evaluating your infection prevention screening needs

One hospital acquired infection (HAI) at any given facility is too many. HAIs hurt hospital finances and reputations in so many ways it is...

Supply fidelis

Someone needs to lead the charge towards standards addoption and tracking implementations. HPN's Rick Dana Barlow has a suggestion...

How can we keep nurses from burning out?

While demand for nurses has long outpaced supply, the issue has reached a fever pitch in the past few years. The problem is twofold:...

Infection Prevention’s C-Suite spot

For the patient’s path to surgery, the OR represents the destination. Supply Chain and SPD represent the journey before and afterward – and everyone is accountable.

May is National High BP Education Month

When treating any disease, it is essential that the clinician and the patient are aligned and equally convinced on the need for change. Clinicians...

SPD beyond phenol phenom

Advocate Christ’s award-winning SPD team bills itself as doing “crucial work” in the “heart of the hospital.” To them, SPD stands for “Serving Patients Diligently.” This may be refreshingly atypical – but it shouldn’t be.